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TALES FROM AROUND THE VICTORIAN WORLD.

YOUR VICTORIAN HUB FOR ALL THOSE LOST TALES OF VICTORIAN LIVES PAST

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Scotland

Faithful unto Death

Taken from ‘Little Folks the Magazine for the Young’ of 1890.

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‘It is hard for those who live in these days to understand the devotion with which the Highland clansmen attended on their chief. At the battle of Killiecrankie (1689), Lochiel was followed by the son of his foster-brother, who watched over him with the most unselfish zeal lest harm should befall him. The chief, missing his friend soon after the fight had begun, found him at last mortally wounded by an arrow. He had just strength enough to tell Lochiel that seeing a soldier in General Mackay’s army aiming at him from the rear, he sprang behind the chief and so saved him from certain death, receiving in his own person the arrow that was intended for Lochiel. Nor was this simple act of heroism rare in those times. Such deeds almost always inspired by a high sense of duty, and occasionally were prompted by true affection.’

“Tinkle-Sweetie.”

Taken from ‘Little folks; A Magazine for the Young” 1890.

‘This is a nice name for an evening bell, is it not?

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 It sounds a great deal pleasanter than the “cover fire,” or curfew, of the Normans.

   Many years ago it was the custom in Edinburgh to have a bell rung at eight o’clock at night, as a sign that it was time to shut up the shops. Such a bell struck sweetly on the ears of the tired shopmen, and so they gave it its pretty name. But more prosy folk called it the “aucht (eight) hours’ bell.”

 

The First Tea in Scotland.

This little snippet is from ‘Sunday Reading for Young and Old’ 1881.

‘The First Tea in Scotland.

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It is said that tea drinking became general in England much earlier than in Scotland; and the reason given is as follows-

   The widow of the Duke of Monmouth, in the year 1685, sent a pound of tea to one of her relations living in the north country. This Chinese product was hitherto unknown there. It was carefully examined, and a cook was summonsed, who, after lengthy examination, gave it as his opinion that it was a dried herb.

   The costly plant was entrusted to him to do as he pleased with it, and he set to work at once, boiled the leaves, threw away the water, and dished them up like spinach.

   The guests found the vegetable but little to their taste, and the credit of tea suffered for a long time afterwards in consequence.’

 

 

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